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Bone Mineral Density (BMD)

Your physician has requested an examination called a “bone mineral densitometry”. A BMD study is a simple and painless way of measuring the concentration of calcium in your bones using a computerized x-ray scanner. You do not need to be fasting for this examination.

See the Bone Mineral Density (BMD) Booklet for more information.

Bone Scan

Your physician has requested an examination called a bone scan. This is a simple and painless way of taking pictures of your bones and joints using a radioactive tracer.

See the Bone Scan Booklet for more information.

Brain Scan

Your physician has requested an examination called a “Perfusion Brain Scan”. This is a simple and painless way of taking pictures of your brain using a radioactive tracer. You do not need to be fasting for this examination.

See the Perfusion Brain Scan Booklet for more information.

Cisternogram

Your physician has requested an examination called a “Cisternogram”. A radionuclide cisternogram is an imaging test that follows the
pathway of spinal fluid in the spinal column and throughout the brain. This test is useful in determining if any obstructions are present in this pathway.

See the Radionuclide Cisternogram Booklet for more information.

Cardiac Perfusion Stress Test

Your physician has requested a test called a cardiac perfusion scan. A cardiac perfusion scan measures the amount of blood in your heart muscle at rest and during exercise.

See the Cardiac Perfusion Stress Test Booklet for more information.

C-14 Breath Test

What is a C-14 urea breath test?
This is a simple and painless way of detecting the presence of bacteria called Helicobacter pylori. in your stomach. Excessive amounts of these bacteria in your stomach can sometimes cause pain and other stomach problems.

See the C-14 urea breath test Booklet for more information.

DMSA renal scan

What is a DMSA renal scan?
A DMSA scan is a renal scan used to assess Pyelonephritis, renal scarring extent and location, as well as differential renal function in the left and right kidneys.

See the DMSA renal scan Booklet for more information.

Gallium Scan

Your physician has requested an examination called a “gallium scan”. This is a simple and painless way of taking pictures of various parts of the body using a radioactive tracer.

See the Gallium Scan Booklet for more information.

Gastric Emptying Study

Your physician has requested an examination called a “Gastric Emptying Study”. A Gastric Emptying Study is a test to determine the time it takes a meal to move through a person’s stomach. Since this test follows the digestive process, it takes four hours to complete all imaging. It is typically ordered by physicians for patients with frequent vomiting, gastroparesis (slow digestion), abdominal pain, early satiety (getting full quickly) and pre operative evaluation.

See the Gastric Emptying Study Booklet for more information.

Gastro-Esophageal Transit/Aspiration

Your physician has requested an examination called a “Gastro-Esophageal Transit/Aspiration Study”. This is a simple and painless way of taking pictures of your ability to swallow. You are required to fast for two hours prior to starting this test. Depending on the information that your physician is looking for, this test can take most of the day to complete.

A technologist will ask you to lie on an imaging table. You will then be asked to drink some water mixed with a small amount of radioactivity. You will experience no reactions to this drink. The technologist will take several pictures of the swallowing process. The camera does not produce radiation; it simply picks up signals (gamma rays) from the radioactive tracers which you received.

Once this first part of the test is complete, you will be given some orange juice to drink. Again the technologist will take several pictures of the swallowing process. In some cases, it may be necessary to take additional pictures at various intervals throughout the day.

You may then return home feeling no ill effects from the examination. The results will be sent directly to your physician.

See the Gastro-Esophageal Transit/Aspiration Booklet for more information.

Gastro-Intestinal Bleed Study

Your physician has requested an examination called a “Gastro-Intestinal Bleed Study”. This is a simple and painless way of taking pictures of your abdomen, to detect a possible internal bleeding, using a radioactive tracer. You do not need to be fasting for this examination.

A technologist will take a small sample of your blood. The technologist will then label your blood with a small amount of radioactivity. This labelling process will take approximately one hour to perform. The technologist will then ask you to lie down on an imaging table and place you under a special detector, called a gamma camera. The technologist will then re-inject your blood into a vein in your arm. The amount of radioactivity in your blood is very small and you will experience no side effects.

The technologist will then take a series of pictures of your abdomen. The procedure takes about 1 hour. The camera does not produce radiation; it simply picks up signals (gamma rays) from the radioactive material which you received. In some cases, it may be necessary to perform additional delayed images later in the day.

You may then return home feeling no ill effects from the examination. The results will be sent directly to your physician.

See the Gastro-Intestinal Bleed Study Booklet for more information.

Gated Cardiac Scan (MUGA)

Your physician has requested an examination called a “Gated Cardiac Scan”. This is a simple and painless way of taking pictures of your heart using a radioactive tracer. You do not need to be fasting for this examination.

See the Gastric Cardiac Scan Booklet (MUGA) for more information.

GFR (Glomerular Filtration Rate) Study

Your doctor has requested a GFR (Glomerular Filtration Rate) of your kidney(s). A GFR study is used to determine how well your kidney(s)
are filtering blood and creating urine. This procedure involves multiple blood samples taken over a period of 4 or more hours.

See the GFR (Glomerular Filtration Rate) Study document for more information.

Hepatobiliary study (HIDA)

Your physician has requested an examination called a “Hepatobiliary study (HIDA)”. This is a simple and painless way of taking pictures of your gall bladder function. This procedure can take up to two and a half to three hours on the day of your appointment, but in many cases is finished after one hour. Many patients will require an injection of a synthetic version of the hormone released when you eat. This causes the gall bladder to contract, and you may feel some discomfort after the injection, especially if you have pain after eating. A small percentage of patients will require an injection of morphine to stimulate function within the liver and gallbladder. The amount of morphine used is small but may affect your ability to drive for a few hours following the procedure. For this reason, it is required that someone accompanies you to your appointment or picks you up after your appointment.

See the Hepatobiliary Study (HIDA) Booklet for more information.

Patients Treated with Radioactive Iodine

The radioactive iodine used for your treatment will remain in your body only temporarily. Most of the iodine not taken up by your thyroid gland will be eliminated during the first few days after your treatment. The iodine leaves your body mainly in your urine, but small amounts may leave in your saliva, sweat and feces.

See the Patients Treated with Radioactive Iodine Booklet for more information.

Lymphoscintigraphy

The lymphatic system includes lymph vessels, lymph nodes and lymph. Lymph vessels carry lymph throughout your body. Lymph is a colorless fluid that helps your body fight infection. As the lymph travels through the lymph vessels, it passes through lymph nodes. The lymph nodes act as filters and can trap foreign particles such as bacteria or viruses. The sentinel lymph node is the first lymph node that cancer is likely to travel from the cancer site. This Nuclear Medicine exam is done to help find the first lymph node that drains from the cancer site before surgery.

See the Lymphoscintigraphy Booklet for more information.

Liver Imaging

Your physician has requested an examination called a “Liver scan”. This is a simple and painless way of taking pictures of your liver using a radioactive substance. You do not need to be fasting for this examination.

See the Liver Imaging Scan Booklet for more information.

Meckel’s Scan

Your physician has requested an examination called a “Meckel’s Scan”. A Meckel’s scan is for detection and localization of a Meckel’s diverticulum containing functioning gastric mucosa. In other words, we are looking for a small section of your bowel that is abnormal.

See the Meckel’s Scan Booklet for more information.

MIBG Scan

Your physician has requested an examination called an “MIBG scan”. An MIBG scan is used for localization of certain types of tumors. This test may also be used to determine the cause of unexplained high blood pressure.

See the MIBG Scan Booklet for more information.

Octreotide Imaging

An Octreotide study is used to detect specific types of tissue within the body that may be causing problems for you. Please speak to your physician if you have additional questions regarding why he would like this test performed.

See the Octreotide Imaging Booklet for more information.

Thyroid Ablation Treatment

After thyroid surgery you will be treated with radioiodine to destroy any remaining thyroid tissue in order to decrease the chances of thyroid carcinoma reoccurring. You will be administered radioactive sodium iodide (radioiodine) by the nuclear medicine department in capsule or liquid form. This type of treatment has been performed for many years with a very high rate of success.

See the Thyroid Ablation Treatment Booklet for more information.

Parathyroid Scan

Your physician has requested an examination called a “Parathyroid scan”. A parathyroid scan is used to examine how your parathyroid
glands are working. It can show conditions that are not seen using other tests or scans. It can also identify parathyroid tissue away from its normal location in the neck.

See the Parathyroid Scan Booklet for more information.

PET/CT Scan

PET scans are a type of nuclear medicine examination. Nuclear medicine examinations are different from X-ray procedures. X-rays show what your body structure looks like whereas nuclear medicine examinations show how your body’s organs are actually working. First you swallow, inhale, or get injected with a substance called a radioactive tracer. This substance travels to the part of your body we want to examine. It gives off energy waves called gamma rays. A special camera builds these rays into a picture. We can diagnose specific problems by looking at these pictures.

See the PET/CT Scan Booklet for more information.

Renal Scan

Your physician has requested an examination called a “Renal Scan”. Your physician has requested an examination called a “renal
scan”. This is a simple and painless way of taking pictures of the blood flow and function of your kidneys using a radioactive tracer.

See the Renal Scan Booklet for more information.

Renal Captopril Study

Your physician has requested an examination called a “Captopril renal study”. This procedure is used to determine specific information about the blood supply and function of your kidneys. This procedure usually involves two stages that will take most of the day to complete.

See the Renal Captopril Study Booklet for more information.

Salivary Scan

Your physician has requested an examination called a “Salivary Scan”. The salivary glands are glands located around the mouth, nose
and ears. These are primarily concerned with the production of the clear liquid released into the mouth that lubricates the mouth and starts the breakdown of chewed food. The saliva is made up essentially of water, enzymes, protein and mucin. A salivary gland scan is a medical test that requires the use of a camera specially designed for the purpose and a radioactive chemical that acts as a tracer which together give the required images of the salivary glands. The procedure helps the doctor to better analyze the cause of problems with your salivary glands.

See the Salivary Scan Booklet for more information.

Thyroid Studies

Your doctor has requested an examination called a “thyroid scan”. This is a simple and painless way of taking pictures of your thyroid gland using a radioactive tracer. You do not need to be fasting for this procedure.

See the Thyroid Scan Booklet for more information.

White Blood Cell Imaging

Your physician has requested an examination called a “White Blood Cell Scan”. A white blood cell scan helps us to detect abscesses and infection in soft tissue or bone or to detect fever of unknown origin. You might have heard your doctor mention a WBC scan. This is just another name for a white blood cell scan.

See the White Blood Cell Imaging Booklet for more information.

Whole Body Iodine Imaging

Your physician has requested an examination called a “whole body iodine scan”. This is a simple and painless way of taking pictures of various parts of your body using a radioactive tracer. You do not need to be fasting for this examination.

See the Whole Body Iodine Imagine Booklet for more information.