Back to Top International Women’s Day 2021: Celebrating some of our exceptional women | The Ottawa Hospital
 

International Women’s Day 2021: Celebrating some of our exceptional women

 
International women's day

In honour of International Women’s Day 2021, we asked four amazing women who work at The Ottawa Hospital one question: What does International Women’s Day mean to you? Here’s what they said.

Suzanne Madore, Executive Vice-President and Chief Clinical Officer

Suzanne Madore holding a #ChooseToChallenge sign

“International Women’s Day (IWD) allows us to celebrate our achievements, to honour and recognize all of the courageous women who came before us, and to pave the way for those who will come after.

IWD provides an opportunity for us to reflect on the great women in our lives— and around the world—who’ve truly made a difference in shaping who we’ve become. No matter what their role, they’ve provided us with the determination and strength to keep moving forward, the inspiration to dream big and the belief and knowledge that we can all achieve whatever we wish to.

“International Women’s Day allows us to celebrate our achievements, to honour and recognize all of the courageous women who came before us, and pave the way for those who will come after.”

Being raised in a household with three brothers influenced my voice and the need to show my strength and resilience very early. As a woman in leadership I’ve learned from adversity, used experiences to build collaborative and meaningful relationships, and gained an appreciation for the art of negotiation.

I’m honored to be an Executive Health Leader at The Ottawa Hospital and so very proud of all that I have accomplished in both my personal and professional life. I feel very privileged to be amongst many dynamic and impressive female leaders!”

Megan Ellis, Indigenous Program Coordinator

Megan Ellis holds a #ChooseToChallenge sign

“International Women’s Day is about recognizing the amazing contributions of women in our personal and professional lives. Professionally, International Women’s Day is a chance to admire and celebrate the accomplishments of our female colleagues. IWD is also a chance to reflect on the obstacles that women navigate daily in the workplace as a result of sexism, racism, and classism, and how we can each act as allies to help address and overcome these biases.

“Personally, International Women’s Day 2021 has me reflecting on my own Métis community, and the value that Métis culture places on honouring women.”

Personally, International Women’s Day 2021 has me reflecting on my own Métis community, and the value that Métis culture places on honouring women. It is a fundamental aspect of our culture to recognize and respect the contributions of women to our families and communities. I’m proud to come from a long line of strong Métis women whose personal and professional accomplishments I celebrate this year, on International Women’s Day!”

Dr. Camille Munro, palliative care physician

Dr. Camille Munro holds a #ChooseToChallenge sign

“I was born in Nova Scotia to parents who immigrated from India. Growing up, I was supported and celebrated by my family and community for my achievements. However, as a woman in medicine, I’ve experienced challenges throughout my education and career because of my gender. International Women’s Day inspires and motivates me further to aim high and to advocate for all women as I believe gender equality is essential to the health, wellbeing and dignity for all girls and women.

“It is a reminder that we should actively choose to challenge stereotypes, fight biases, broaden perceptions, be inclusive and celebrate women’s achievements every day.”

IWD is a day to recognize and celebrate the outstanding achievements of women around the world. Women have made significant contributions socially, economically, culturally and politically, and inspire future generations to succeed. Presently, women around the world are playing a tremendous role responding to COVID-19, including as front-line health-care workers, caregivers and educators in their communities. However, women and girls are also enduring the worst of the pandemic’s impact such as unemployment, loss of educational opportunities, and decreased access to health care.

On this day, we can spread awareness and help highlight the challenges women face. It is a reminder that we should actively choose to challenge stereotypes, fight biases, broaden perceptions, be inclusive and celebrate women’s achievements every day.”

Nataleigh Oliveira, Registered Nurse in the Birthing Unit

Nataleigh Oliveira holds a #ChooseToChallenge sign

“To me, International Women’s Day commemorates the ongoing struggles and aspirations towards women’s fair place in society and the quest for equality. It challenges the belief that the social structures that currently exist must necessarily exist, and it empowers women with the opportunity to speak up, participate, narrate, consent or dissent. IWD thereby shapes our society by redefining who speaks and who is heard, thus safeguarding the stories of women everywhere as something of value.”

“IWD thereby shapes our society by redefining who speaks and who is heard, thus safeguarding the stories of women everywhere as something of value.”

Join the live Facebook event on March 8 at noon for a deep dive into the experiences of these four exceptional women who work at The Ottawa Hospital and be inspired by their words of wisdom

The 2021 International Women’s Day theme is #ChooseToChallenge.  Together, we can create an inclusive world! You’re encouraged to participate in the celebration and Strike the #ChooseToChallenge pose.

A brief history of International Women’s Day

International Women’s Day  has been observed for more than 100 years.  In 1908, 15,000 women marched through New York City demanding shorter working hours, better pay and voting rights. In 1910 a second International Conference of Working Women was held in Copenhagen with representation of more than 100 women from 17 countries, representing unions, socialist parties, working women’s clubs and more. There, the idea of an annual International Women’s Day celebration was proposed. On March 19, 1911 the first annual International Women’s Day was honored in Austria, Denmark, Germany and Switzerland. More than one million women and men attended International Women’s Day rallies campaigning for women’s rights to work, vote, be trained, and to hold public office, as well as advance the effort to end discrimination.

Happy International Women’s Day!

 
Comment

Comment on this post

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

*


You might also like…

2021 Excellence Awards: The Ottawa Hospital’s incredible people and teams celebrated at special virtual event

The Ottawa Hospital’s Excellence Awards features outstanding leaders and volunteers, committed academics and educators, hidden heroes, and team players. This year, we celebrated our shining stars virtually with the help of a few special guests!

“My nurses made me feel safe and told me I was strong”: A tribute to nurses during the COVID-19 pandemic

In honour of Nursing Week 2021, Dr. Debra Bournes, Chief Nursing Executive and Vice-President, Regional Cancer Care at The Ottawa Hospital shares heartfelt thanks from patients and expresses her gratitude to nurses for the compassionate care they have provided during the COVID-19 pandemic.

University students give roses to hospital staff on Valentine’s Day

CU and UO Smile club members deliver 400 roses to front-line staff at The Ottawa Hospital to show their gratitude this Valentine’s Day.

Our community thanks staff at The Ottawa Hospital

From school children to celebrities to first responders and the public, thousands of people continue to say ‘thank you” for all you have done for our community. Take a look!

Resident physicians provide world-class care to patients at The Ottawa Hospital

As important members of the front line, read how some of our residents at The Ottawa Hospital are providing world-class care to patients during the COVID-19 pandemic.

This website gives you common facts, advice and tips. Some of it may not apply to you. Please talk to your doctor, nurse or other health-care team member to see if this information will work for you. They can also answer your questions and concerns.