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Finding information about your health shouldn’t be complicated. Healthy Tomorrows is a collection of health stories, insights and tips from experts at The Ottawa Hospital to help you and your family live healthier lives.

Man sneezes into a tissue
Nothing to sniff at: Screening platform identifies drugs that could fight the common cold

A team led by Dr. Robin Parks has developed a new way to identify drugs that may be good candidates for treating the common cold.

Team members from the Schlossmacher lab include (clockwise from top left) Dr. Michael Schlossmacher, Dr. Bojan Shutinoski, Quinton Hake-Volling, Dr. Julianna Tomlinson and Nathalie Lengacher
Unravelling the mystery of how one gene contributes to Parkinson’s, Crohn’s and leprosy

Researchers have struggled for years to understand how mutations in one gene, called LRRK2, can increase the risk of three very different diseases. Now, a Canadian team has found that inflammation is the likely culprit.

Pharmacist Pierre Giguère
Pharmacist developed app to reduce drug interactions, improve HIV patient care

Pharmacists and members of the public can quickly check the safety and compatibility of HIV and hepatitis C drugs with other commonly prescribed medications, thanks to a new app that Ottawa Hospital Pharmacist Pierre Giguère helped develop.

image of Dr Virginia Roth
Infection control experience gives wider view of health care: Dr. Virginia Roth is the first female Chief of Staff

She has worked on some of the most high-profile diseases in recent years, including H1N1, SARS and MRSA. Now, Dr. Virginia Roth oversees the approximately 1,400 doctors at The Ottawa Hospital as the new Chief of Staff – the first female doctor to do so. “As physicians, we care very much about our patients and their specific needs.”

Clinical Research Coordinator Nancy Tremblay
HIV study: injection versus pill

When John Henry spent three weeks cycling across Great Britain last summer, he didn’t need to take along a three-week supply of antiretroviral pills for HIV. As part of a study at The Ottawa Hospital, Henry receives an injection once every eight weeks instead.

Lower C. difficile Rate Spells Success for TOH SWAT Teams

June 21, 2013 – The Ottawa Hospital (TOH) was recognized by Public Health Ontario this month for the work we have done to combat the C. difficile infection. Our efforts to improve hand hygiene, infection-control practices, and environmental-cleaning practices are working. Over the past few months, TOH has worked closely with the provincial public-health agency […]

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